Advanced Manufacturing 

Advanced Manufacturing is a full year (40 week) course. Students will be immersed in a manufacturing and industry 4.0 environment where they will be running their own small business within a team. Production methods and workplace skills will be taken on by students and the classroom will be treated and run as an advanced manufacturing facility. 

Students may have roles in production, packaging and shipping, material handling, information processing, engineering, automation, accounting, and advertising.

Throughout the year students will take field trips to local industry partners to experience job and career pathways with the advanced manufacturing industry. 

What skills/ experiences will I have?

Business Management

Marketing & Advertising

Engineering Problem Solving

Workplace readiness skills

Team-building

Blue Print Reading

Material Processing

CNC Machining

Automation and basic coding

Lean Manufacturing Processes

5S Workplace maintenance

*A fun & rewarding experience making professional products in a clean, fast-paced, real-life environment. *

KSB 1.1 Overview of Manufacturing

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Manufacturing is critical to the economy.
2. Evolution of manufacturing and its impact.
3. Careers associated with manufacturing.
4. A product may be created with more than one manufacturing process
using different materials.
 

Performance Tasks
The students are required to:
1. Discover manufacturing through researching online sources and the
“How It’s Made” series on the Discovery Channel.
2. Research a particular product and discuss the process by which it is made.
Develop an individual presentation and present findings to the class. (The
length of the presentation may vary depending on the number of students
in the class)
3. Explain the evolution of manufacturing graphically. Incorporating industry 4.0

 
 

KSB 1.2 Introduction to Manufacturing

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Manufacturing is a series of interrelated activities and operations that involve product design, planning, production, materials control, quality assurance management, assembly and marketing of a product.
2. Customer needs analysis using recognized marketing research techniques
(interviews, surveys, online research, etc.) and identifying what the
consumer wants with demand and wishes.
3. Overview of safety in manufacturing.
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Engage in an activity to understand the needs of customers before manufacturing a product. Application of recognized market research techniques.
2. Conduct an interactive quiz on safety for the students. This is conducted
by the students for the students.

 

KSB 1.3 Basics Needed for Manufacturing

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Strength of materials must be understood qualitatively, e.g., understanding the difference between hard, soft, brittle and ductile materials.
2. Quality control is a key process in manufacturing. Overlooking quality control can lead to catastrophes.
3. Jigs and fixtures are vital in maintaining consistency and quality control.
4. Knowledge of measurement, calibration, accuracy, precision and tolerances, and difference between SI and metric units.

5. Reading a set of technical blueprints from a CAD model
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Bring samples each of hard, soft, brittle and ductile materials to present
to class.
2. Complete a hands-on activity with Go-No go gauging to demonstrate understanding of the concept.
3. Complete photo assignment on jigs and fixtures.

 

KSB 2.1 Design for Manufacturing

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Design for manufacturing – manufacturing must be considered as part of the design process.
2. Material properties must be considered as part of the design process.
3. Analysis of case studies on previous manufacturing failures as a way for engineers to avoid failures in the future.
4. Reverse engineering and its potential benefits for manufacturing.

5. Computer Aided Modeling
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Complete a CAD model of a part of a product currently in production within the class.
2. Disassemble and analyze a simple product to understand the concept of Reverse Engineering.

3. Fits and Tolerances 

          Worksheet-

           Video

 

KSB 2.2 Types of Manufacturing Processes

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Difference between additive and subtractive manufacturing.
2. Understanding the mechanism by which material is removed from stock.
3. Classification of subtractive manufacturing processes.
4. Classification of additive manufacturing processes.
5. Classification of forming – is forming additive or subtractive manufacturing?
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Prepare an individual concept map on types of manufacturing processes.
2. Complete a hands-on activity for demonstrating the mechanics of manufacturing processes of PUSH vs. PULL manufacturing using subtractive manufacturing processes in a teacher made demonstration

KSB 2.3 How Conventional Manufacturing Works

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. The process of material removal in subtractive manufacturing.
2. Heat generation due to friction and control of temperature during manufacture. Ex: heat during CNC production methods
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:

  1. Complete a before and after analysis of temperature variation within production & Brainstorm different ways to control the temperature during manufacture.
     

 

KSB 2.4 Computer Integrated Manufacturing

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Mass production is used when there is a set of repetitive steps involved in making large numbers of a given product.
2. Robots are used to perform diverse functions and work in diverse environments.
3. Computers have distinct advantages over humans in some industrial settings (e.g., hazardous environments, repetitive motion, or long hours).
4. The technique of “handshaking” is used to allow robots and other machines to communicate and coordinate their activities smoothly.
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Program the desktop robotic arm DOBOT to complete welds on a car body frame

 
 

KSB 3.1 Milling and Drilling

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. The difference between milling and drilling.
2. The history of the lathe.
3. Knowledge of the tools required for milling.
4. CNC milling and the tolerances it can achieve.
5. 3-axis milling and its automation.
 

Performance Tasks:
Students are required to:
1. Complete a hands-on activity using a mill and laser engraver.

 

KSB 3.2 Lathe

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Definition and construction of a lathe.
2. Examples of common objects that were made on a lathe.
3. The difference between two of the most basic operations, facing and turning.
4. The process of threading, with examples.
5. Left-hand and right-hand threads and their uses.
6. The process of knurling.
 

Performance Tasks:
Students are required to:
1. Participate in a demonstration activity on a lathe.
2. Complete a quiz on the basics of lathes and lathe operations.

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Definition and construction of a lathe.
2. Examples of common objects that were made on a lathe.
3. The difference between two of the most basic operations, facing and turning.
4. The process of threading, with examples.
5. Left-hand and right-hand threads and their uses.
6. The process of knurling.
 

Performance Tasks:
Students are required to:
1. Participate in a demonstration activity on a lathe.
2. Complete a quiz on the basics of lathes and lathe operations.

KSB 4.1 Introduction to Forming

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. The mechanism of forming.
2. Scenarios where forming is advantageous.
3. Process parameters and costs of forming.

 
 

KSB 4.2 Extrusion

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Mechanisms of extrusion and evolution of the process (and its use in restaurants!).
2. Materials that can be extruded.
3. Factors that affect the quality and finish of extruded products.
4. Automation of extrusion.
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Complete a hands-on activity to understand extrusion –

 

KSB 4.3 Molding

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Mechanisms of molding, casting, pattern making
2. The history and evolution of molding.
3. Difference between compression molding and injection molding.
4. Knowledge of the key terms, such as pattern, riser, runner, cooling time, etc.
5. The impact of molding on mass production and how it is achieved.
6. Introduction to allowances, such as shrinkage allowance, draft allowance, finishing or machining allowance, shake allowance and distortion allowance.
7. Materials that are commonly molded.
8. Costs involved in molding.


Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Complete a hands-on activity on molding – injection mold a part and compare tolerances of finished cooled part

KSB 5.1 Sheet Metal Forming

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. The concept of malleability in materials.
2. Is sheet metal forming an additive or subtractive manufacturing process?
3. Commonly used tools for sheet metal forming.
4. Materials and tooling costs for sheet metal forming.
 

Performance Task
Students are required to:
1. Complete a hands-on activity – make a product nameplate for a product coming off the assembly line using sheet metal, powder coating, and a laser engraver.

 
 

KSB 6.1 Introduction to Additive Manufacturing

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Why is there so much hype around 3D Printing?
2. Prototyping and how it has revolutionized product design and
development.
3. Key advantages and limitations of additive manufacturing.
4. Time, cost and labor required for additive manufacturing.
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Complete a skill builder assignment on cycle time & waste in conjunction with 3D printing by creating a print.

 

KSB 6.2 Selective Laser Sintering

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Qualitative physics of powder sintering.
2. Build direction and scanning patterns.
3. Advantages of Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process.
4. Materials choices for SLS.
5. Introduction to Direct Metal Laser Sintering.
 

 

KSB 6.3 Stereolithography

Concepts addressed in the lesson:
1. Qualitative physics and chemistry of solidifying photosensitive resins.
2. Build direction and scanning patterns for Stereolithography (SLA).
3. Advantages of SLA process.
4. Materials choices for SLA.
 

Performance Tasks
Students are required to:
1. Review pictures of objects made with different additive manufacturing
processes and identify the process with which each was made.
 

© 2020 Leif Sorgule